Skip to main content

japanese

scl_info

Inserting and Removing Scleral Lenses 1280×480

Home »

Inserting and Removing Scleral Lenses

When you handle scleral lenses incorrectly, poor hygiene and improper cleaning can increase your risk of getting an eye infection. For this reason, it’s crucial to follow your eye doctor advice on how to properly care for your contact lenses.

Before Handing Scleral Lenses

Make sure to do the following before inserting or removing scleral lenses:

  • Always wash your hands thoroughly with antibacterial pump soap or non-oily soap and dry them with a clean paper towel or lint-free towel.
  • To insert and remove your lenses, sit at a table or desk with a lint-free cloth. Bathrooms frequently have more germs than other areas in the house, so avoid them when handling scleral lenses.
  • Examine your lenses for chips or cracks, as well as protein deposits on the surface. If you see any flaws or are unclear whether your lenses are broken, have your eye doctor inspect them before wearing them.

Inserting Scleral Lenses

  1. Remove your scleral lenses from their storage case and rinse them with saline. If you’re using a hydrogen peroxide solution, wait at least 6 hours for the solution to neutralize after you place the lenses in the storage case. Before placing the lens on the eye, always clean it with saline.
  2. Secure the scleral lens to a suction instrument (plunger) provided by your optometrist, or insert it between your middle finger, forefingers and thumb (the tripod method).
  3. To prevent air bubbles from accumulating between your eye and the lens, fill half the bowl of the lens with preservative-free saline solution. In a facedown position, place the lens directly on the middle of your eye.
  4. With a tissue, wipe and dry your lens case, then leave the cover off to air dry.

Removal of Scleral Lenses

Scleral contact lenses can be removed in two ways: with your fingers or with the help of a plunger. To remove your lenses, press firmly on your bottom eyelid just below the edge of the lens with your finger, then push upward.

Suction Tool

  1. Hold your bottom lid open while looking in the mirror in front of you. Attach the suction tool to the bottom of the lens after wetting the tip for greater adhesion.
  2. Remove the lens with the suction tool by tilting it up and out of the eye.

Manual Removal

  1. To loosen the lens, use a drop of preservative-free saline solution or artificial tears.
  2. Look down at a level surface (a towel or mirror can be placed there).
  3. Use your middle finger to open your eyelid wider than the lens diameter.
  4. Push down on the eyelid and apply pressure to the middle of the lid, as close to the lashes as possible, to move your eyelid beneath the lens and pull it off the eye.

Caring for Your Scleral Lenses

Always follow your optometrist’s advice when it comes to contact lens care.

Never use tap water at any stage of lens maintenance, including rinsing and filling your lens case. Tap water contains a variety of harmful microbes, including acanthamoeba, which can cause a severe, painful and sometimes sight-threatening infection. Before handling your lenses, make sure your hands are clean and completely dry after using a lint-free towel.

Use a Filling Solution That Is Preservative-Free

Before inserting your scleral lenses, fill the bowl of the lens with unpreserved sterile saline solution. Using preserved saline solution raises the risk of infection.

Use a Peroxide Cleaner

Soaking your scleral lenses in 3% hydrogen peroxide solution sterilizes them. The catalyst in the case converts hydrogen peroxide into oxygen gas and water over the course of 6 hours. This deep cleans your lenses and eliminates the need to rub them, lowering the danger of accidentally breaking them. If you use the lenses before they’ve been immersed for 6 hours, the un-[neutralized] peroxide will irritate your eyes. When not in use, let the lens case dry.

Remove Before Going to Sleep

Most people can wear scleral contact lenses for up to 12-14 hours at a time without any discomfort. The optimal time to remove the lenses is around an hour before going to bed. If your lenses fog up in the middle of the day, remove them and clean them before reinserting them.

Remove Debris Using Multi-Purpose Lens Solution

Remove your scleral lenses and rub them for 2 minutes in a contact lens case filled with saline solution after properly washing and drying your hands. Microorganisms and sediments are effectively removed, minimizing your risk of infection. While scleral lenses are durable, they can be broken if used or handled incorrectly.

After massaging your lenses, rinse them well for 5-10 seconds with the solution. Then place them in a case filled with new solution for at least 4 hours to disinfect.

Routinely Clean and Replace Your Lens Case

To avoid infection from bacterial contamination, clean and replace your lens case on a regular basis.

Cleaning the storage case on a daily basis is recommended, as is replacing it monthly or as directed by your eye doctor.

Your optometrist will let you know when it’s time for a new pair of scleral lenses and when you should book a follow-up appointment. Failure to show up for scheduled appointments can [jeopardize] your lenses’ effectiveness.

At The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates, we can recommend the optimum wearing schedule for your contact lenses to provide the highest level of comfort and visual acuity. Always follow the advice given to you by your eye doctor. Call today to make an appointment for an eye exam and scleral lens fitting.

Our practice serves patients from New York City, The East Side, Roslyn, and Nassau County, New York and surrounding communities.
Request An Appointment
Call Our Offices

Learn More About Scleral Lenses

Are Your Gas Permeable Lenses Uncomfortable Try Scleral Lenses Thumbnail.jpg

Are Your Gas Permeable Lenses Uncomfortable? Try Scleral Lenses!

Specialty FAQ Thumbnail.jpg

Scleral Lenses: FAQ

What Is Keratoconus Thumbnail.jpg

What Is Keratoconus?

Cleaning Caring for Scleral Contact Lenses Thumbnail.jpg

Cleaning & Caring for Scleral Lenses

Read Our Latest Posts
Are Contact Lenses Not Working for You 640×350 1.jpg

Regular Contact Lenses Not Working for You? Consider Scleral Lenses

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses

8 Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

8 Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses

happy couple in winter 640×350 1.jpg

6 Things To Know About Keratoconus

Keratoconus Patients Can Avoid Corneal Surgery With Scleral Lenses 1280

Home »

Keratoconus Patients Can Avoid Corneal Surgery With Scleral Lenses

All surgical procedures come with risks, which is why they are usually prescribed as a last resort after trying other interventions.

This is equally true for keratoconus—an eye disease that causes the cornea to become misshapen. Although corneal surgery is generally safe, it can at times lead to complications like infection, permanent corneal scarring, transplant rejection and corneal haze.

Research has shown that patients with severe keratoconus who wear scleral lenses significantly reduce their need for corneal surgery.

Below, we’ll cover the ins and outs of keratoconus and explain how scleral lenses can safely and effectively manage the condition.

What is Keratoconus?

Keratoconus affects approximately 0.05-0.25% of the global population. It is a progressive eye condition that causes the cornea to thin and become cone-like in shape, affecting how light enters the eye. It usually affects both eyes but may lead to differing vision in each eye if a single eye is affected.

Symptoms of keratoconus include:

  • Blurred or distorted vision
  • Increasing sensitivity to light or glare
  • Red or swollen eyes
  • Increasing nearsightedness or astigmatism
  • Frequent changes in lens prescription
  • The inability to wear standard soft contact lenses

The exact cause of keratoconus isn’t well understood, but risk factors for developing the disease include genetics, oxidative damage, eye rubbing and certain health conditions like allergies, asthma, Down syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa.

In the early stages of keratoconus, soft contact lenses or glasses may be enough to successfully correct vision. But over time, the cornea becomes so misshapen that these methods are no longer effective. Surgical procedures performed on keratoconus patients include corneal cross-linking, refractive surgery and keratoplasty (corneal transplant).

What are Scleral Lenses?

Scleral lenses have a larger diameter than standard soft lenses and cover most of the sclera (the white part of the eye).

Because they don’t put any pressure on the cornea or sclera, they are very comfortable to wear—even for patients with corneal disease. The lens prevents the bulging cornea from rubbing against the eyelid and protects it from environmental irritants.

The space between the scleral lens and the eye is filled with a nourishing liquid that allows oxygen to reach the eye while keeping it hydrated. It also acts as an artificial cornea that helps focus light into the eye, providing sharp and clear eyesight.

Scleral lenses are tailor-made for each eye to ensure the patient achieves the best vision possible.

How Scleral Lenses Can Reduce the Need for Corneal Surgery

In a study involving 51 eyes with severe keratoconus, 40 of them were able to avoid surgery by wearing scleral lenses. While all patients in the study were candidates for corneal transplants, scleral lenses cut the need for keratoplasty by more than half over a 5-year span.

In fact, the study found that managing stage 4 keratoconus with scleral lenses was more effective and safer than keratoplasty.

The features of scleral lenses are ideal for keratoconus patients in several ways. Because they don’t touch the cornea, the rate of scar formation slows down and the cornea isn’t irritated. Moreover, scleral lenses are very stable and fit securely to the eye’s surface. This prevents them from moving around with each blink (as standard lenses do), making them much more gentle on the patient’s sensitive eyes.

If your or a loved one has been diagnosed with keratoconus or is experiencing any of the associated symptoms, we can help. A consultation with Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick will help determine the best-suited treatment for your eyes.

Schedule an appointment by calling one of our friendly staff members at The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates today.

Our practice serves patients from New York City, The East Side, Roslyn, and Nassau County, New York and surrounding communities.
Request An Appointment
Call Our Offices

Learn More About Scleral Lenses

What Is Keratoconus Thumbnail.jpg

What Is Keratoconus?

eye pain Thumbnail.jpg

Corneal Disease and Scleral Lenses

Corneal Collagen Cross Linking for Keratoconus Thumbnail.jpg

Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking for Keratoconus

Read Our Latest Posts
Are Contact Lenses Not Working for You 640×350 1.jpg

Regular Contact Lenses Not Working for You? Consider Scleral Lenses

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses

8 Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

8 Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses

happy couple in winter 640×350 1.jpg

6 Things To Know About Keratoconus

girl putting on scleral lenses

Home »

Why Do Scleral Lenses Sometimes Get Foggy?

Scleral lenses provide a successful contact lens option for people with corneal conditions such as keratoconus, severe dry eye, and those needing vision correction following eye surgery. Unfortunately, about 30% of patients with scleral lenses may experience lens fogging. This requires them to remove their lenses and refresh the saline solution, that keeps their lenses lubricated, multiple times a day. Here are some reasons why scleral lenses fog up and tips on how to keep your lenses clear.

What is Midday Fogging?

Midday fogging is when scleral lenses fog up after a few hours of wear. The most likely causes appear to be an accumulation of debris from the tears between the lens and the cornea or an inflammatory reaction of the eye or eyelids to the contact lenses.

Fogging Caused by Debris

Blinking can sometimes cause the debris to dissipate, but it doesn’t always help. There are three types of tear debris that may lodge between the eye and the lens and cause fogging.

Mucin Debris

Mucin is an opaque, white, fluffy, oil-like layer of the tears. If the fit of the scleral lens isn’t perfect, mucin debris can move from the tears into the tear reservoir behind the scleral lens. If this is the case, your eye doctor will evaluate how the scleral lens fits and make the required adjustments to its design, most likely changing the peripheral edge lift.

The peripheral edge lift, the very edge of the scleral lens, allows a refreshing flow of tears to get under the lens and into the tear reservoir behind the scleral lens. However, if there is too much lift, excessive tears will flow, allowing debris to accumulate in the tear reservoir.

If the peripheral edge lift is the problem, the lens edge may be irritating your eyelid. Your eye doctor may ask you to reduce the amount of time you wear the lens, or have you remove and reapply the lens during the day. Another option is following a lens cleaning regimen using an enzymatic cleaner or a sodium hypochlorite-potassium bromide-based system.

Meibomian Debris

Meibomian glands are tiny glands in your eyelids that produce the essential oils for our eyes. Meibomian debris can be caused by Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD) or blepharitis. The debris occurs when the oils of your tears find their way under the lens and appear as semi-transparent droplets of oil floating on water. It can disperse light, like an oil slick, or appear yellowish in color.

To reduce this form of debris your eye doctor will treat the underlying cause in the eyelids as well as review the lens design. If issues with meibomian debris persist, removing and reapplying the lens can help as well.

These types of debris can occur in combination, resulting in multiple management strategies.

Front Surface Debris

Front surface debris is any debris found on the outside of the scleral lens, from the buildup of protein to the debris mentioned above. External sources such as oil-based lotions, makeup, and face and hand soaps can also cause foggy vision. Knowing where the debris is coming from can help you and your eye doctor eliminate the problem.

To remove foggy vision, make sure to wash your hands with mild hand soaps, and then rinse before handling your lenses. Also, make sure to apply face cream or makeup after inserting your lenses. Avoiding oil-based moisturizers on the eyelids, and not applying makeup to the inside area of the eyelid margin or over the meibomian glands can decrease the risk of MGD or obstruction.

Fogging Due to Inflammation

Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC)

GPC is an inflammatory reaction caused by the contact lenses. It occurs in up to 15% of all hard lens wearers and is likely due to the edge of the lens rubbing up against the conjunctiva, the protective layer on the eyelids and the outside part of the eyes. The signs of GPC are red, swollen and irritated eyelids.

If you have GPC your eye doctor may alter the design of your lens, most commonly the peripheral edge lift, and prescribe mast cell stabilizer antihistamine drops or reduced lens wearing time. The doctor may also do a deep clean of the lens with a sodium hypochlorite-potassium bromide-based system with enzymatic cleaners.

Atopic Disease and Keratoconus

Another type of debris that someone might experience with scleral lenses is due to an association between atopic disease (typically associated with the immune response to common allergens). This type of debris appears as a diluted milk-like fog in the scleral lens fluid reservoir under the lens.

Your eye doctor may recommend the following treatment options, including: reducing excessive edge lift, reducing base curves, taking an antihistamine to reduce inflammation, lens removal and reapplication, or in extreme cases, topical steroids.

Scleral lenses can be a great option for many patients, even if fogging occurs. These management strategies, along with proper lens care, can go a long way to ensure healthy life-long scleral lens wear. Contact The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates to determine what may be causing your foggy vision and how to treat it today!

Our practice serves patients from New York City, The East Side, Roslyn, and Nassau County, New York and surrounding communities.
Request An Appointment
Call Our Offices

Learn More About Scleral Lenses

Are Your Gas Permeable Lenses Uncomfortable Try Scleral Lenses Thumbnail.jpg

Are Your Gas Permeable Lenses Uncomfortable? Try Scleral Lenses!

Specialty FAQ Thumbnail.jpg

Scleral Lenses: FAQ

What Is Keratoconus Thumbnail.jpg

What Is Keratoconus?

Cleaning Caring for Scleral Contact Lenses Thumbnail.jpg

Cleaning & Caring for Scleral Lenses

Read Our Latest Posts
Are Contact Lenses Not Working for You 640×350 1.jpg

Regular Contact Lenses Not Working for You? Consider Scleral Lenses

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses

8 Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

8 Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses

happy couple in winter 640×350 1.jpg

6 Things To Know About Keratoconus

Cleaning Caring for Scleral Contact Lenses 1280×480

Home »

Cleaning & Caring for Scleral Contact Lenses

Scleral lenses offer an effective contact lens solution for those with various ocular conditions, such as dry eye syndrome, keratoconus, keratoglobus, pellucid marginal degeneration, post-LASIK ectasia, post corneal transplant, and irregular astigmatism.

Their unique design provides unparalleled comfort and visual acuity. Custom-fit to the contour of your eyes, these large lenses comfortably vault over the cornea and gently rest on the sclera. A fluid reservoir between the lens and the cornea optically neutralizes any corneal irregularities and hydrates the ocular surface, providing a moist and comfortable environment between the eye and the lens.

However, to benefit from the lens’s unique features, you need to follow basic hygiene guidelines explained below.

How To Clean and Care for Your Scleral Lenses

First and foremost, never ever use tap water in any area of lens care, whether to rinse or fill your lens case. Tap water contains acanthamoeba, a microorganism that can cause a severe, painful and sight-threatening infection. Make sure that your hands are fully dry using a lint-free towel prior to handling your lenses.

Remove Your Scleral Lenses Before Going to Sleep

Most people can comfortably wear scleral contact lenses for up to 12 to 14 hours at a time. The best time to remove the lenses is approximately an hour before going to sleep. If your lenses fog up in the middle of the day, it’s best to remove them at that time.

The fogginess might be due to a poor fit. If the lens is poorly aligned with the eye it causes fogginess, which, in turn, causes mucus to form and get trapped in the saline layer of the lens, leading to blurred vision. At The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates, we ensure the best fit for our patients, thanks to our professionally custom-designed lenses fit each eye. This prevents misalignment and fogging. If you experience any fogginess, please get in touch with our optometric team.

Remove Debris Using Multi-Purpose Lens Solution

Once you’ve thoroughly washed your hands and dried them, remove your lenses and rub them for 1-2 minutes in the contact lens case filled with saline solution to remove any debris. Doing so effectively removes any deposits and microorganisms, and lowers the risk of infection. Though scleral lenses are strong, too much force or incorrect technique can cause them to break. After rubbing, thoroughly rinse the lenses using the solution for 5-10 seconds, and place them in the case once you fill it with fresh solution. Leave it there to disinfect for at least 4 hours.

Use a Peroxide Cleaner

This solution sterilizes your lenses by immersing them in 3% hydrogen peroxide. Over a period of 6 hours, the catalyst in the case transforms the hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen gas. This deeply cleans your lenses and removes the need to rub them, thus decreasing the risk of accidental breakage. Make sure not to use the lenses before the 6 hours are up, as the un-[neutralized] peroxide will painfully sting your eyes. Leave the lens case to dry when not in use.

Use a Filling Solution That Is Preservative-Free

Use unpreserved sterile saline solution when inserting scleral lenses by filling the bowl of the lens upon insertion. Don’t use tap water or a preserved solution as these can lead to an eye infection.

Routinely Clean and Replace Your Lens Case

Using a case without regularly cleaning and replacing it can cause ocular infection due to bacterial contamination. We advise you to clean the storage case on a daily basis and to replace it monthly or as advised by your [eye doctor].

At The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates, you will receive the first-rate eye care you deserve. No matter your questions or concerns, Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick will be happy to explain how to best care for your lenses to ensure the highest level of comfort and vision acuity.

Cleaning your scleral contact lenses is vital for your eye health, and so are follow-up appointments with your [eye doctor], who will provide you with specific lens cleaning instructions and ensure that your vision remains clear, safe & secure.

Our practice serves patients from New York City, The East Side, Roslyn, and Nassau County, New York and surrounding communities.
Request An Appointment
Call Our Offices

Learn More About Scleral Lenses

Are Your Gas Permeable Lenses Uncomfortable Try Scleral Lenses Thumbnail.jpg

Are Your Gas Permeable Lenses Uncomfortable? Try Scleral Lenses!

Specialty FAQ Thumbnail.jpg

Scleral Lenses: FAQ

What Is Keratoconus Thumbnail.jpg

What Is Keratoconus?

scleral lenses sometimes get foggy thumbnail.jpg

Why Do Scleral Lenses Sometimes Get Foggy?

Read Our Latest Posts
Are Contact Lenses Not Working for You 640×350 1.jpg

Regular Contact Lenses Not Working for You? Consider Scleral Lenses

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses

8 Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

8 Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses

happy couple in winter 640×350 1.jpg

6 Things To Know About Keratoconus

Woman Faraway Look 1280×480

Home »

What Is Keratoconus?

Keratoconus (keh-rah-toe-cone-us) is a condition in which the structure of the cornea is not strong enough to maintain its spherical shape, causing the cornea to bulge outward into a shape resembling a cone. This leads to a host of symptoms, including blurred and double vision, as well as halos around objects and streaks of light.

Below you’ll learn more about this condition and discover how Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick at The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates can offer a wide range of successful options, so you can keep enjoying clear and comfortable vision.

What is Keratoconus?

Keratoconus is a progressive eye disease in which the dome-shaped cornea thins, causing the cornea to develop a cone-like shape. The misshapen cornea deflects light, causing distorted vision and may result in blurred vision, double vision, myopia, irregular astigmatism and sensitivity to light.

This rare eye condition affects 1 out of every 2,000 people and typically begins in the teenage years and early 20s, with vision deteriorating over a period of about 10 to 20 years. It’s common for people with this disease to see prescription changes with each eye exam.

Keratoconus often runs in families, so if you or your children are at risk or are experiencing any of the symptoms mentioned below, contact The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates for an eye exam. Keratoconus can only be diagnosed through a thorough eye exam, where Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick will examine your cornea and measure its curvature.

Man Smiling Field 1280x853

What Causes Keratoconus

Your cornea is held in place by very small collagen fibers. When they are weakened, they cannot preserve the spherical dome-like shape of your cornea. The exact cause of keratoconus, however, is still unknown.

Weakening of the cornea tends to happen in those with a genetic predisposition, which is why keratoconus may affect several people in a single family.

Keratoconus has also been linked to:

  • Excessive exposure to UV rays
  • Excessive eye rubbing
  • Difficulty wearing contact lenses
  • Certain eye injuries
  • Retinitis pigmentosa
  • Marfan syndrome
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

Symptoms of Keratoconus

As the shape of your cornea begins to bulge, it alters your eyesight. Your normally smooth corneal surface becomes wavy and expands, becoming cone-shaped. This causes irregular astigmatism or nearsightedness. The condition tends to begin in one eye and later develops in the other eye as well.

Typically, one’s prescription will change frequently as vision worsens, over time it will also become more difficult to wear contact lenses due to the changing shape of the cornea. If the contact lenses are not properly fitted on someone with Keratoconus, the lenses may rub against the most vulnerable part of the cornea. The excessive rubbing then causes symptoms to worsen by aggravating the already thin cornea. When the symptoms of keratoconus intensify, the cornea can begin to swell and form scar tissue. This scar tissue can result in worsening visual distortion and blurred vision.

pexels tim savage 736716

Symptoms during the early stages of keratoconus:

  • Mild blurred vision
  • Slightly distorted vision (straight lines appear bent or wavy)
  • Some sensitivity to light and glare
  • Red-eye and/or swelling
  • Chronically irritated eyes

In its later stages, one tends to experience:

  • Increased blurred and distorted vision
  • Nearsightedness or irregular astigmatism
  • Inability to wear regular contact lenses

Keratoconus Treatments

There are several ways to treat this condition. When the symptoms are still mild, you can correct your vision using eyeglasses. As the condition progresses, there are several treatment options.

  • Scleral contact lenses. For improved visual acuity, gas permeable scleral lenses are usually the preferred treatment. Scleral lenses vault over the cornea, replacing its irregular shape with a smooth, uniform refracting surface that provides clarity and comfort.
  • Custom soft contact lenses. These customized soft lenses are specially designed to correct mild-to-moderate keratoconus.
  • Piggyback contact lenses. For those with keratoconus, fitting a gas permeable (hard) contact lens over a cone-shaped cornea may at times prove uncomfortable. “Piggybacking” involves placing a soft contact lens over the eye and then placing a GP lens over the soft lens. This increases wearer comfort because the soft lens acts like a cushioning pad under the rigid GP lens.
  • Hybrid contact lenses. These lenses combine a highly oxygen-permeable rigid center with a soft peripheral “skirt”. Some hybrid lenses are specifically designed for keratoconus, with the central GP area of the lens vaulting over the cone-shaped cornea.
  • Intacs. This small curved device is surgically placed in your cornea to help flatten the corneal curvature and improve vision.
  • Corneal collagen cross-linking. Used together, special UV light and eye drops can strengthen the cornea, thus flattening your cornea and preventing further expansion.
  • Corneal transplant. As a last resort, you may be advised to undergo a corneal transplant, where all or part of your distorted cornea is replaced with healthy donor cornea tissue. Even after a transplant, however, you may still need to wear glasses or contact lenses for clear vision.

Contact Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick at The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates to find out whether scleral lenses are right for you.

Our practice serves patients from New York City, The East Side, Roslyn, and Nassau County, New York and surrounding communities.
Request An Appointment
Call Our Offices

Learn More About Scleral Lenses

eye pain Thumbnail.jpg

Corneal Disease and Scleral Lenses

Keratoconus Patients Can Avoid Corneal Surgery With Scleral Lenses  Thumbnail.jpg

Keratoconus Patients Can Avoid Corneal Surgery With Scleral Lenses

Corneal Collagen Cross Linking for Keratoconus Thumbnail.jpg

Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking for Keratoconus

Read Our Latest Posts
Are Contact Lenses Not Working for You 640×350 1.jpg

Regular Contact Lenses Not Working for You? Consider Scleral Lenses

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses

8 Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

8 Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses

happy couple in winter 640×350 1.jpg

6 Things To Know About Keratoconus

Hybrid Contact Lenses

Hybrid Contact Lenses for Comfort and Versatility

A hybrid contact lens is a gas permeable or “hard” lens with an outer skirt made of soft or silicone hydrogel material. The hard center offers clear vision found with gas permeable lenses (GP) while providing the same level of comfort and ease as any soft lens.

Because the rigid gas permeable lenses are hard, certain people may find them uncomfortable. However, with hybrid lenses, which are larger in diameter, the rigid part of the lens vaults over the cornea and the soft skirt holds it in place in order to keep it from moving around and rubbing against the cornea.

Hybrid lenses are great for those seeking to correct myopia (nearsightedness) or hyperopia (farsightedness) and may be particularly beneficial for patients with specific types of visual impairments, such as:

  • Keratoconus
  • Irregular or high Astigmatism
  • Those uncomfortable with toric or multifocal contact lenses
  • Post-corneal transplants

Hybrid contact lenses are available in single-vision and multifocal lenses.

If you’re interested in learning more about hybrid lenses, contact The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates today!

How Are Hybrid Lenses Different From Regular Contact Lenses?

flowers in springHybrid lenses compare to soft contact lenses in the way they are inserted and removed. However, they differ in their replacement schedule. While hybrid contact lenses can last up to 6 months, soft contact lenses generally require daily, bi-weekly or monthly replacements. This is because hybrid contact lenses are far more durable in design — though their longer life span also means a more rigorous cleaning process to prevent bacterial growth.

A brief adaptation period is required to learn the methods of inserting and removing hybrid contact lenses. Your eye care professional will provide instructions on how to handle the lenses. Contrary to soft contact lenses, that may turn inside-out when pressed down during cleaning or inserting, hybrid contact lenses retain their bowl-like shape. If the edge or soft skirt ever creases out of shape, gently smooth the edge back into shape before insertion. In contrast, with soft contact lenses, any change in shape generally signals that it’s time to replace your lenses.

Because of the variety of hybrid contact lenses available, we recommend you speak with Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick to determine the best option for you. For example, certain hybrid lenses are beneficial for those with keratoconus or irregular corneas, while others, like the UltraHealth FC by SynergEyes, is prescribed for patients with flat corneas — which could develop following eye surgery, such as RK or similar refractive surgery.

A bit of trial and error will be required to discover what lens ultimately works for you. We will guide you through the available options to help you discover the most comfortable and suitable lens for your needs.

The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates proudly serves patients from New York City, The East Side, Roslyn, Nassau County and throughout New York.

Request An Appointment
Call Our Offices

Home »

Frequently Asked Question

How Much Do Scleral Contacts Cost?

Unlike regular contact lenses, scleral lenses are custom fit to the eye. This requires significantly more training on the part of the optometrist, expensive equipment and multiple visits to achieve the optimal fit. In addition to the fitting process, the patient must also be trained on how to properly care, insert and remove scleral lenses. This is why professional fees associated with fitting scleral lenses are higher than traditional contact lenses.

Our optometric team at The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates will be happy to discuss your specific costs and payment options based on your individual needs.

Does Insurance Cover The Costs Of Scleral Lenses?

Scleral lenses are not automatically covered by vision or medical insurance. Though most insurances will reimburse the costs for scleral lenses when medically necessary, the rates and restrictions tend to vary greatly from one vision insurance provider to the next.

We will be happy to provide assistance in helping you apply insurance benefits to your scleral lenses. However, given that insurance policies vary widely, we cannot guarantee how much coverage you will receive from your provider.

It’s important to note that scleral lenses, which are hard lenses, last far longer than soft contact lenses. While their costs may be higher, their many benefits and lifespan make it a worthwhile investment.

What Happens During a Scleral Lens Fitting?

  • Consultation and testing (Digital Imaging)
  • Measurement and fitting
  • Dispensing of the lens
  • Training on how to care, insert and remove the lenses.
  • Follow up(s) for micro-adjustments

Are Scleral Lenses Custom Fit?

Designed by Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick, all scleral lenses are custom-made to match the exact contours of your eyes. A topographer digitally maps out the exact dimensions and shape of your eyes resulting in custom-designed scleral lenses that ensure maximum comfort and acuity. Thanks to our latest technology, we can provide microscopic precision when developing each scleral lens.

Our patients experience enormous relief when they see that they can manage their keratoconus and other corneal conditions successfully without surgery.

Our practice serves patients from New York City, The East Side, Roslyn, and Nassau County, New York and surrounding communities.
Request An Appointment
Call Our Offices
Learn More About Scleral Lenses
3 Ways That Scleral Lenses Treat Dry Eyes Thumbnail.jpg

3 Ways That Scleral Lenses Treat Dry Eyes

Specialty Contact Lens Fittings Thumbnail.jpg

Why Health Professionals Refer Patients To Us

scleral lenses sometimes get foggy thumbnail.jpg

Why Do Scleral Lenses Sometimes Get Foggy?

Keratoconus Myths Thumbnail.jpg

Keratoconus Myths & Misconceptions

Types of Astigmatism And Correction Options Thumbnail.jpg

Types of Astigmatism And How They Can Be Corrected

Treatments for Keratoconus Thumbnail.jpg

What Treatments Are For Keratoconus?

Are There Other Contact Lens Alternatives Thumbnail.jpg

Are There Other Contact Lens Alternatives?

Young Woman Smiling Thumbnail.jpg

How Do Scleral Lenses Treat Dry Eye?

how Fits Specialty Contact Lenses Thumbnail.jpg

Who Fits Specialty Contact Lenses?

What is Corneal Dystrophy Thumbnail.jpg

What is Corneal Dystrophy and How Can Scleral Lenses Help?

Read Our Latest Posts
Are Contact Lenses Not Working for You 640×350 1.jpg

Regular Contact Lenses Not Working for You? Consider Scleral Lenses

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses

8 Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

8 Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses

happy couple in winter 640×350 1.jpg

6 Things To Know About Keratoconus

Try Scleral Lenses

Are Your Contact Lenses Uncomfortable?

Most people are familiar with the traditional soft lenses which provide clear vision for those with nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (hyperopia), or astigmatism. In certain cases, particularly for those with corneal irregularities or astigmatism, Gas Permeable (GP), Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) or Scleral Lenses are recommended.

Some people experience discomfort when wearing gas permeable lenses. For those patients, scleral lenses may be a more successful alternative.

What Are Gas Permeable Contact Lenses?

Modern-day hard contact lenses often provide sharper vision than eyeglasses or soft contact lenses. Gas permeable lenses are made of hard plastic materials and are called ‘permeable’ because they transmit oxygen to the cornea, thus keeping it healthy. GP lenses are ideal for individuals with astigmatism that may have been told that they cannot wear soft contact lenses.

The rigid nature of the lens holds its shape on the eye, which allows for more clear and stable vision correction. Though it takes a little bit of time to get used to wearing GP contacts, the clarity of vision and durability that these lenses provide make it worthwhile. Gas permeable lenses are uniquely fitted to each patient and take about a week to manufacture.

What are Scleral Contact Lenses?

Custom designed scleral lenses help patients with sensitive eyes or corneal irregularities achieve dramatic improvements in visual acuity and comfort. Scleral lenses vault over the cornea and rest on the sclera instead. This creates a new optical surface and prevents discomfort by minimizing irritation to the cornea. Moreover, the reservoir of pure saline solution between the back surface of the lens and the front of the cornea ensures that the eye is always in a liquid environment – making it optimal for health and comfort. This unique design makes scleral lenses the ideal lens for comfort, sharp vision and healthy eyes.

We recommend scleral lenses for the-hard-to-fit eyes, those with keratoconus, or astigmatism, or for people with a medium-high astigmatism that other contacts can’t comfortably correct. Scleral lenses are also perfect for anyone wanting to wear comfortable lenses while keeping eyes hydrated all day.

Below are the advantages and disadvantages of wearing GP lenses. This information can better assist you in making a better decision with regards to whether to choose one over the other.

What are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Wearing Gas Permeable Lenses?

Advantages of Gas Permeable Contact Lenses

Gas permeable contact lenses have a number of distinct advantages over typical soft contact lenses. In many instances of various eye conditions, a GP contact is required as soft contacts will not be comfortable or deliver the vision correction required. Here are some advantages.

Health & Hygiene

close eye with scleral lenseBecause these lenses are oxygen permeable, they provide the wearer with better comfort and a healthy cornea. Their ability to transmit oxygen reduces eye problems, such as dry eyes, which is caused by diminished oxygen transmission to the cornea – common among most soft lens’ brands or hard (non-GP) lenses.

GP lenses are made from a firm plastic material and retain their shape when you blink. This tends to provide sharper vision than pliable soft lenses and are extremely durable; unlike soft contact lenses, they don’t tear easily. They are easy to clean and disinfect, and when properly cared for, a pair can last a year or more.

Gas permeable lenses are made of materials that do not contain water and thus don’t absorb water from your eyes. Moreover, they harbor fewer protein and lipid deposits from your tear film than other contact lenses do, which renders these lenses a more hygienic and healthier alternative for your eyes.

Enhanced Comfort With Scleral Lenses

GP lenses have a smaller diameter than soft contacts, meaning that they cover less of the surface of your eye. While this may take some time to get used to initially, ultimately, many wearers may find that these lenses become comfortable over time.

Improved Visual Clarity

Due to their rigid material, GP lenses have a smooth surface and maintain their shape, moving along with the eye to hold their place. This provides sharp and stable vision. Furthermore, because they do not dehydrate, they don’t cause reduced vision, which is usually the case with traditional contact lenses. GP lenses can be worn on all eyes, but are particularly fitting for those with astigmatism or bifocal needs.

Cost of Gas Permeable Lenses

GP lenses are durable and long-lasting. Though costs are initially higher than traditional contact lenses, in the long term they are more cost-effective, and unlike disposable lenses, they don’t require ongoing replacement.

So why doesn’t everyone wear gas permeable lenses? Primarily because soft lenses are instantly comfortable, whereas GP lenses require an adaptation period before they reach the same level of comfort.

Disadvantages of Gas Permeable Contact Lenses

Sometimes, whether due to sensitivity, corneal irregularities, or various eye conditions, a gas permeable contact lens isn’t the ideal solution and scleral lenses may be required or preferred.

Requires an adaptation period

To achieve maximum comfort with GP lenses, you need to wear them regularly. If not worn for a week, you’ll require a few days to adapt and get comfortable wearing them again. This distinguishes them from soft contact lenses, which, even if not worn for a long period of time, are comfortable upon insertion.

Unstable on the eye

GP lenses are smaller in size than soft lenses, which means that they are sometimes prone to shifting or popping out. If stability is essential, scleral lenses are a better bet.

Dust and debris

Happy Girl Fingers Near Eyes 1280x853Because gas permeable lenses move on the eye with every blink, there is a higher risk of dust and debris getting lodged under the lenses. This can lead to discomfort and potential corneal abrasion.

If you’ve tried gas permeable lenses and have experienced any of the above, or if you’re seeking a more comfortable alternative to wear all day, it’s worth looking into scleral lenses.

Visit us to find out how scleral lenses can be a better option for you. At the The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates, our eye doctors specialize in fitting custom contact lenses, including sclerals, which provide excellent, effective vision correction for many hard-to-fit eye conditions, such as keratoconus and irregular corneas. We also recommend scleral lenses for astigmatism, when other types of contacts don’t work well.

We fit sclerals for patients from the New York City area, as well as The East Side,Roslyn, Nassau County and throughout New York.

What are the Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses?

Scleral lenses provide the very best level of comfort, visual acuity and stability.

Stable Vision

With scleral lenses, you’ll experience consistently clear vision. Their large diameter ensures that they stay centered and stable on your eye. Their size also prevents scleral lenses from popping out easily, even if you play sports or lead a very active lifestyle.

Long-Lasting Lenses

Constructed from high quality, durable materials, these gas permeable lenses typically last for the long haul. Therefore, while the initial cost of scleral lenses may be higher than standard contacts, you’ll benefit from the maximum value for your money.

Safe and Easy-to-Use

The large size and rigid material make scleral lenses much easier to insert and remove from your eyes. These features also reduce the risk of accidentally injuring your cornea while you handle your lenses.

Comfort for Dry Eyes

While the scleral lenses vault over your cornea, they contain a pocket filled with moisturizing tears. This wet, lubricating cushion offers a very comfortable wearing experience, as well as healthier eyes. In addition, because sclerals don’t touch your corneal surface, rubbing is [minimized] and your risk of corneal abrasions is drastically diminished.

Wide Visual Field

The wide optic zone provides wearers with a wider, more precise peripheral vision. They also reduce sensitivity to glare and light.

Cost-effective

Scleral lenses are custom-fit to each eye. Though the fees for fitting sclerals and the cost of the lenses are higher than standard lenses, their life span and benefits make the cost worthwhile.

Though coverage rates and restrictions vary among providers, if considered a medical necessary, most insurance companies will reimburse the cost of scleral lenses. Consult with our eye care team at the The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates to discuss your specific payment options and cost of scleral lenses.

Are Scleral Lenses Better Than Gas Permeable Lenses?

In terms of comfort, visual clarity and stability, scleral lenses are superior to gas permeable lenses. In cases of corneal irregularity or severe sensitivity, scleral lenses are often the only viable option. However, they are more costly than GP lenses as well.

The question of which contact lens is best for you should ultimately be decided in conversation with us. Trained in fitting specialty contact lenses of various types, from the simple near-sighted first-time wearer to the complex astigmatic, bifocal or distorted cornea patient, Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick will consult with you about your best options.

We help patients from throughout New York City, The East Side, Roslyn, Nassau County and throughout New York area enjoy great vision and comfort with scleral lenses.

Request An Appointment
Call Our Offices

scleral lenses Blu 1280×480

Home »

When Gas Permeable Lenses Fail, Scleral Lenses Can Help

When it comes to contact lenses, most people are familiar with soft lenses to help give them a clear vision for nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (hyperopia), or astigmatism. In some cases, Gas Permeable (GP) or Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) lenses are recommended. In other cases, they’re less efficient for long-lasting wear.

When this happens, scleral lenses can be a better option. At The The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates Scleral Lens and Keratoconus Center, we help patients throughout New York.

Knowing the advantages and disadvantages is important and can make a big difference in comfortable – and superior – vision.

Close-up of woman's hazel eyeWhat Are Gas Permeable Contact Lenses?

Gas permeable contacts are lenses which are made from hard plastic materials. They’re called ‘permeable’ because they allow oxygen to pass through and reach the front of your eye for a more breathable feel.

Unlike soft lenses, GP lenses don’t contain any water. Because of this, many patients find that their GP contacts dehydrate less often. They’re also more durable because the firm materials make it hard for the lenses to tear.

The Advantages Of Gas Permeable Contact Lenses

Gas permeable lenses give our patients some great benefits. In addition to giving you good vision correction for common vision problems, they also offer:

Breathability

More oxygen means that air can reach the cornea, letting your eye “breathe”. This gives you better comfort for all-day wear.

Affordability

GP lenses are tailor-made for each patient. Although there is an initial higher cost, over time, they’re actually more cost effective since you won’t need to replace them often. Similar to a custom-designed outfit, GP lenses may be priced higher at first, but they provide greater long-term value.

Reduced Likelihood Of Attracting Bacteria

Since they don’t hold water, gas permeable lenses are less likely to have bacteria and harmful buildup. This makes them more hygienic and a healthier choice for your eyes.

However, gas permeable lenses may not be for everyone.

The Disadvantages Of Gas Permeable Contact Lenses

While gas permeable lenses offer benefits to patients with vision correction needs, there are some disadvantages you should know about.

It Takes Time To Get Used To Them

Patients who are used to soft contacts find that it takes a while to get used to GP lenses. That’s because of something called ‘lens awareness’. When you blink, you can feel the edge of the lens in your eye. Lens awareness doesn’t hurt or cause discomfort, but patients report feeling something odd in their eye or sensing a sudden physical reminder that the lens is there.

They Move Around Your Eye

Gas permeable lenses are known to slip off the center of your eye. This usually lasts for mere seconds, but when it happens multiple times throughout the day, it can become irritating very quickly.

Tiny Particles Can Get Underneath

You know that feeling when something is stuck in your eye? This can happen with GP lenses. Tiny pieces of debris can get lodged underneath the lenses, causing pain or discomfort.

If you’ve tried gas permeable lenses and have had any of these experiences, or you’re simply looking for something more comfortable for all-day wear, it’s time to try scleral lenses.

Asian female with finger circling eye, smilingHow Long Do Gas Permeable Contact Lenses Last?

Assuming that your prescription doesn’t change, gas permeable contact lenses typically last up to 1 year. Scleral lenses usually last for up to 3 years, but as with all types of contact lenses, make sure you use the lens case, contact solution and any other materials as instructed by your eye doctor. This will make sure you enjoy continued clear, comfortable vision and make your lenses last longer.

Can You Sleep With Gas Permeable Contact Lenses?

Not surprisingly, according to Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick, it is ill advised to do so. Wearing contacts overnight prevents oxygen from entering the cornea and can increase the risk of developing corneal infections or ulcers. Always take them out before going to sleep, clean and store them safely.

Can You Sleep With Scleral Lenses?

In most cases, it isn’t recommended. Only sleep in scleral lenses if specifically instructed to by your doctor.

Why Do My Gas Permeable Contacts Get Cloudy?

When gas permeable contacts become cloudy, it’s usually due to tiny particles of dirt or debris that get stuck inside or around the lens. This can also be caused by protein buildup, which can usually be cleaned off, but if that doesn’t work, it may be the quality of GP lenses themselves.

Scleral lenses rarely become cloudy, unless due to a phenomenon called “midday fogging”. This is when tiny debris cause the lenses to fog up. If this should happen, simply remove the lenses and gently rinse them with artificial tears. This usually resolves the issue quickly. You can always contact our office for help, too.

Are Scleral Lenses Better Than Gas Permeable Lenses?

Some patients with misshapen corneas find that scleral lenses give them clear vision for longer periods of time. This happens because of their ability to cover a larger area of the eye without touching the cornea directly. In fact, a recent study from the London South Bank University confirmed that scleral lenses were particularly effective in treating eye diseases due to irregularly shaped corneas.

How Much Do Gas Permeable Contacts Cost?

The cost of gas permeable lenses depends on each patient’s condition and prescription needs. For example, if your eye doctor recommends disposable bifocal contact lenses, an estimated per-box cost for these lenses is $50 to $70 (similar to the cost of disposable toric contacts). GP lenses usually average around $200 a pair.

Scleral lenses are custom-made for each patient. This is because every patient’s cornea has a unique shape, so each scleral lens must fit the eye exactly. Because of this personalized fit, the cost of scleral lenses is usually higher than standard contact lenses, which are mass produced. However, sclerals last up to 3 years, so they’re more cost-effective in the long term.

If you have a corneal disease, your insurance coverage may pay for scleral lenses. For specific insurance questions, contact The The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates Scleral Lens and Keratoconus Center.

Beautiful Diverse Group Of Women Talking And Laughing

Most People Prefer Scleral Lenses Over Gas Permeable Lenses

Like gas permeable lenses, scleral lenses are also made from rigid materials, but that’s where the similarities end. Scleral lenses are specially-designed contact lenses with 2 unique features: a large diameter and a tiny, built-in reservoir of water.

Scleral lenses have a larger diameter than traditional lenses, giving them the ability to rest over the entire area of the sclera (the white part of your eye), but without directly touching the cornea. They also contain a tiny pool of artificial tears, which is built in to the lens. This constantly lubricates your eyes for superior comfort all day long.

Speak with Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick to see if you’re a candidate for scleral lenses.

So if you have dry eyes, keratoconus, or other corneal conditions and your GP lenses aren’t cutting it, or you’re ready for an upgrade of comfort and long-term value, it’s time to try scleral lenses. Schedule a consultation with Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick today.

Request An Appointment
Call Our Offices

Corneal Collagen Cross Linking for Keratoconus 1280×480

Home »

Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking for Keratoconus

Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) is currently the only treatment that may slow down the progression of keratoconus. This is a minimally invasive procedure to strengthen corneal tissue and stabilize the cornea’s shape.

If you have been diagnosed with keratoconus, or if you are concerned that your condition might be deteriorating, contact Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick at The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates to evaluate whether CXL is the best option for you.

What Is Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking?

Corneal collagen cross-linking is a surgical procedure performed by a corneal specialist or ophthalmologist to stabilize the shape and firmness of the cornea. By applying riboflavin (vitamin B2) eye drops and ultraviolet light, the surgical treatment promotes the building of new collagen fiber links within the cornea. In many cases, it helps prevent the need for a corneal transplant.

Collagen plays a vital role in creating and maintaining the smooth round shape of the eye’s surface. The tightness of the woven collagen fibers determines the strength of the corneal tissue. A weak cornea is prone to deformation, causing keratoconus to progress.

CXL is also effective in treating corneal ulcers in cases where topical antibiotics did not produce results. Several other corneal infections have also successfully been treated with CXL.

Your Optometrist Prepares You for CXL

A few steps need to be taken before you undergo corneal collagen cross-linking. Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick can assess whether you are a candidate and get you ready for the surgical procedure.

1) We’ll Evaluate If You Need CXL

At The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates, we will inquire into your patient history to determine whether any previous eye surgeries might prevent you from undergoing CXL. We will also examine several other factors, such as keratoconus progression and corneal thickness. In case you have dry eye, this needs to be treated appropriately before scheduling the CXL procedure.

2) Connecting You With The Right Surgeon

Following your eye exam and the evaluation of your suitability for CXL, we will connect you with an ophthalmologist to schedule the actual procedure. We at The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates work with the finest corneal specialists in the area because we want you to be in good hands.

3) Pre-Op Exam With Your Optometrist

Just before the surgery, you will have a short pre-op examination at The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates. Lens wearers are required to remove their contact lenses a few days prior to this examination so that measurements can be entirely accurate.

We will gather measurements about visual acuity, refraction, the shape of the corneal surface, and intraocular pressure. The data generated in this examination will be used for comparison in every future examination, and provide background for follow-up should the keratoconus continue to progress after the surgical intervention.

The CXL Procedure

seniors smiling 2 640The ophthalmologist will first apply riboflavin eye drops (vitamin B2) to the surface of the eye. This substance is conducive to photo-enhancing; in other words, it improves light absorption. Next, the practitioner will expose the eye to a specific ultraviolet light to activate the development of new collagen cross-linking. This will cause the collagen fiber to thicken across the entire cornea and reinforce it.

There are two types of corneal cross-linking procedures:

  • Epithelium-on cross-linking or transepithelial cross-linking. In this procedure, the doctor applies the eye drops onto the outer layer of the cornea, called the epithelium.
  • Epithelium-off cross-linking. To allow the riboflavin to penetrate more easily into the lower layers of the cornea, the doctor removes its outer layer before applying the drops. This surgical intervention has a slightly higher risk, as it could cause the disruption of surface cells in the epithelium.

We Provide Post-Op Care

The success of the one-hour surgical treatment depends as much on the quality of postoperative care as it does on the procedure itself. Careful management of eye health is essential for rapid rehabilitation of visual clarity and to reduce the risk of complications.

Follow-up care provided at The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates includes three main objectives, of which the speedy healing of the corneal surface is primary. Generally, patients are prescribed temporary soft contact lenses to protect the eye surface during the healing process. The lenses also serve the purpose of minimizing potential pain.

To prevent infections, Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick will provide topical antibiotics and other medications that may be needed to protect the cornea and ensure a safe and fast recovery.

Who Can Undergo Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking?

The surgical treatment is recommended for patients who have recently been diagnosed with keratoconus and patients with a rapidly worsening condition. The sooner the treatment is applied, the better the chances of strengthening the cornea or even improving its shape.

Because CXL does not restore lost vision, early treatment is critical to prevent visual acuity from declining. This can also increase the chances of wearing traditional contact lenses later on.

Patients with stable keratoconus, a thin cornea, or a scarred cornea may not benefit from CXL and can potentially delay or avoid the procedure altogether.

Contact Dr. Farkas, Dr. Kassalow, and Dr. Resnick at The Scleral Lens Center at Drs. Farkas, Kassalow, Resnick & Associates for additional information or to schedule an eye exam.

Resources:

Our practice serves patients from New York City, The East Side, Roslyn, and Nassau County, New York and surrounding communities.


Request An Appointment
Call Our Offices

Learn More About Scleral Lenses

What Is Keratoconus Thumbnail.jpg

What Is Keratoconus?

eye pain Thumbnail.jpg

Corneal Disease and Scleral Lenses

Keratoconus Patients Can Avoid Corneal Surgery With Scleral Lenses  Thumbnail.jpg

Keratoconus Patients Can Avoid Corneal Surgery With Scleral Lenses

Read Our Latest Posts

Are Contact Lenses Not Working for You 640×350 1.jpg

Regular Contact Lenses Not Working for You? Consider Scleral Lenses

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses

8 Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

8 Benefits of Wearing Scleral Lenses

happy couple in winter 640×350 1.jpg

6 Things To Know About Keratoconus